Fright Night (1985) – A Parody of Dracula

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“Welcome to Fright Night, for real.”

Instead of Jonathan Harker procuring a new home for the blood sucking and lip smacking Count Dracula, his highness Jerry Dandridge (Chris Sarandon) acquires a new house himself for his retreats in Tom Holland’s horror comedy. When high school hipster and ardent gothic horror fan Charley Brewster (William Ragsdale) discovers that his new neighbor is in fact a vampire, he has nowhere to run. Nobody believes him and this Lord Vampire is after him because he is the boy who knows too much.

The characters of Fright Night are all based on Bram Stoker’s magnum opus, Dracula. The boy trapped in this muddle is the Jonathan Harker of Fright Night. His girlfriend, the innocent, Amy (Amanda Bearse) is none other than the pious Mina Harker enchanted by the eyes of Dracula. Their common friend, Evil Ed (Stephan Geoffreys), the subservient of Mr. Vampire, reflects the madness of the insane scientist, Renfield. And, the biggest marvel, vampire hunter Peter Vincent (Roddy McDowall) takes up the avatar of the legendary Dr. Abraham van Helsing – adding his own touch of cowardice over the chivalry of Dr. van Helsing, his phoniness over the ingenuity of the legendary philosopher.

Like Dracula, Fright Night squeezes the supernatural, with pinches of melodrama, romance, and adventure. It’s smart, witty, fun, fast-paced, and entertaining. You wouldn’t know when it started and when it ends. One wild marathon from start until the end, Fright Night is perhaps just be an episode in the life of fictional vampire hunter turned into real life vampire predator, Peter Vincent. And for all those factors, it works.

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Using traditional vampire elements created by Bram Stoker, we see plenty of garlics, crucifixes, wooden skates, holy water, mud, and coffins. Holland also enthralls viewers to special appearances by Vampire, the Bat and Vampire, the Wolf, with the inciting role of Lucy (in the novel) adorned by two hookers that Charley notices arriving at this Count’s hermitage. In the subsequent days, both go missing creating frenzy in the small town, but Charley knows why they’re missing and takes it as his responsibility to save the town from this undead monster. But how does he do it? With the help of his friends and a flop television personality of course, but there’s a problem – nobody believes him.

Fright Night plays on the myths and symbols of vampirism. It’s not merely a satire, it’s a parody of Dracula and it’s damn entertaining. Chris Sarandon takes the role of the vampire and he’s a natural. Suave, vicious, charming, and neat – Sarandon treats this role like his own and makes a perfect vampire. A Dracula fan would perhaps be mildly disappointed with the lack of chivalry of this beast, but in the flow of events, it turns out well. Vampires, after all, aren’t chivalrous creatures, are they?

In some ways, Fright Night resembles Coppola’s Dracula (1992), with the ethereal romance between Jerry and Amy. Only here, it’s rushed and underdeveloped, whereas in Coppola’s masterpiece, the love story takes the center stage. It would appear that Mr. Coppola was more inspired by the undeveloped romantic saga between two time-separated lovers here than from the actual book by Bram Stoker, where such suggestions only bode down to racy imagination.

Not since Roman Polanski’s Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) has there been a horror comedy so enchanting and entertaining as Fright Night. Unlike other serious movies on vampires though, Fright Night relieves the viewers instead of alarming them; it amuses them instead of scaring them away.

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A memorable parody of Dracula, the novel, Fright Night is an easy watch and a perfect movie on a slow day. It’s unexpectedly good and wildly engaging. Craig Gillespie remade the movie in 2011 with Colin Farrell and Anton Yelchin (playing Jerry and Charley), but the original remains a must-see, especially for fans of vampires. It’s also a nice addition to the folklore of vampirism.

Watch this clever comedy for the thrills and the mayhem; it’ll relieve you of your duties, with a smile that is.

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