Soul Sister (2015) – Eternal Darkness of the Sauntering Mind

Soul-sister-Nepali-Movie-Cover-Namrata-Shrestha

Soul Sister is dark, dreary, and devoid of life. It’s unbuckled, which makes for a placid experience, but ultimately goads you to tussle with a myriad of illusions set forth by Prashant Rasaily in this pseudo-psychological thriller.

Meet Maya (Namrata Shrestha), a lonesome figure who’s lived under the warmth of her aunt (played by Raveena Deshraj Shrestha) since her Mom passed away when she was still a child. As Maya grows to become one fine woman, her aunt turns her attention to her own life—and at last, settles down. She crosses the oceans of reality with her fiancée (Rajesh Hamal in a cameo) leaving the depressed Maya behind to wrestle with her own illusions.

Maya returns to her old house. It is in this isolated hermitage, she comes to terms with her inner demons, her subconscious setting the stage for a surrealistic finale.

Unfortunately, that wasn’t to be the case with Soul Sister.

Prashant Rasaily captures the scenic beauties of Sikkim and Kathmandu like it has rarely been shown in Nepali feature films. His intelligent use of lights and beautiful composition of shots need no vindication for audiences conversant with Rasaily’s cinema. Soul Sister has a soulful tone and painted with a gloomy ambience, it feels calm and serene—very mystical. Yet, it’s not a film for everybody. Amidst the murmurs of bored cine goers 10 minutes into the movie, it was clear that the movie failed to hold the attention of the fickle multiplex audiences.

With Soul Sister, Rasaily tries his hand at the so-called Avant-garde cinema rather than laying the emphasis on telling a story about a woman’s journey. Precisely why, Soul Sister seems pretentious, especially the English dialect, which covers 80% of the conversation. For such a grave movie, one would find it difficult not to chuckle after hearing Namrata Shrestha force her oratory muscles with poetic proses that are neither hummable, nor lyrical.

For its flaws, Soul Sister does have an anecdote to tell. A bare tale of a platonic extramarital affair, Prashant Rasaily manages to weave it as a philosophical discourse on human psychology. Maybe taking it a too far in his quest for abstract realism.

As a movie, Soul Sister is a winner at conceptual level, but that is also sadly, where it stumbles. What appears to be a beautiful flash of creative spark seems to have become the blueprint for this movie; the makers not bothering in developing it as a tangible story, which would have been acceptable if the abstract hadn’t imploded in the final act. The climax pours water over anything positive in Soul Sister. It’s not only drastic; it’s impulsive and nullifies the novelty of this otherwise ominous-looking movie.

Soul Sister is perfect imperfection defined. It appears beautiful, but is a classic case of style over substance, vanity over sincerity, indulgence over contemplation. It fails to encompass the nuances of phenomenology or do justice to the theory of absurdity, Rasaily was intending for. Half-baked is the right word.

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